Franklin County Democrats

The official site of the Democratic Party of Franklin County, Missouri

Here is the article from which the Jan 28 graphic was taken:

What ALEC has in store for children, educators, and American workers

Posted December 3, 2014 by Brian Washington

Politicians looking to trade their votes for lavish gifts recently engaged in three days of backroom dealing in Washington, D.C. that will eventually result in legislation in your state designed to help corporations make a profit at the expense of the environment and off the backs of children, educators, and working Americans.

Those politicians attending the American Legislative Exchange Council’s (ALEC) policy summit earlier this month in Washington, DC, will be getting cozy with some of the richest corporations in the country. The sole purpose of the secret gathering is to come up with bills lawmakers can use as templates in their own states to move the agenda of the nation’s richest 1-percent.

It’s already happening in Wisconsin, where an ALEC politician has just introduced legislation designed to silence workers’ voices by undermining their unions. And in Missouri, politicians there have introduced a similar bill that takes its wording directly from the ALEC playbook.

However, there is some good news. Noticeably absent from this year’s summit were representatives from Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook as well as several other tech giants. These groups broke ties with ALEC over its policies attacking global warming and renewable energy.

Everyone understands climate change is occurring and the people who oppose it are really hurting our children and our grandchildren and making the world a much worse place,” said Google’s Chairman Eric Schmidt when asked on a national radio program what made Google dump ALEC. “And so we should not be aligned with such people — they (ALEC) are just, they’re just literally lying.

Almost 100 companies have dropped their ALEC memberships since the deadly 2012 shooting of Trayvon Martin in Florida. ALEC was the primary backer of the “Stand Your Ground” law that has become inextricably linked to the teen’s death.

But don’t count ALEC out just yet—especially after the November elections which saw conservatives take control of 68 of the 98 state legislative bodies nationwide. This means you can expect to see more attacks on public education budgets in state governments across the country in the form of vouchers, which use public dollars to pay for private school tuition costs, and huge cuts to public school funding.

According to ALEC’s executive director, last month’s elections were “a historic victory for limited government, free markets and federalism”—which, with ALEC involved, spells trouble for children, educators, and public schools.

Meanwhile, ALEC has spawned a new group to attack children, American workers, and public education. It’s called the American City County Exchange or (ACCE). ACCE will zero-in on those politicians connected to city and county governments as well as local school boards who are willing to accept ALEC’s lavish gifts in exchange for helping to move the group’s conservative, right-wing agenda.

According to newspaper reports, ACCE is already making plans to block employees from having a voice in the workplace and prevent workers from taking advantage of minimum wage increases voters overwhelmingly approved in several states including Alaska, Arkansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Click here to get the latest information about actions you can take to bolster public education in your community.

from: http://educationvotes.nea.org/2014/12/03/alec-politicians-big-corporations-plot-to-undermine-the-rights-of-children-educators-and-american-workers/

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by Otto Fajen   MNEA Legislative Director

Number 4   Jan. 29, 2015

SENATE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee heard four bills related to student transfers and accreditation January 28: SB 1 (Pearce), SB 22 (Chappelle-Nadal), SB 49 (Sifton) and SB 70 (LeVota).  Sen. Pearce outlined the provisions of a committee substitute bill based largely on discussions with House and Senate leaders on the student transfer legislation and the Governor’s office.  Additional documents will be shared with the committee early next week and the committee may vote on a revised bill at next week’s meeting.

Revisions to the school transfer law will get a lot of attention again this session.  The transfer issue, while important, is also a symptom of the broader failings of the current accreditation system.

Missouri NEA supports efforts to restore local control regarding enrollment of non-resident students to ensure that district capacity is evaluated and respected.  The Association also supports revision to the tuition rate calculation to reduce the disproportionate impact on sending districts and extra resources to reduce the adverse impact on unaccredited districts.

HOUSE EMERGING ISSUES COMMITTEE

This newly-created committee met for the first time on January 26.  The committee held an organizational meeting.  The committee will work on key legislation regarding student transfers from unaccredited districts this session.  The committee heard a presentation from Rep. David Wood, who is the sponsor of HB 42.  Rep. Wood will be a primary handler of House legislation regarding student transfers. The committee will meet on Feb. 2 to hear HB 42 and consider amendments.

HOUSE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee met for the first time on January 26.  The committee held an organizational “meet and greet.”

HOUSE HIGHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee held its first meeting on January 27.  The committee heard informational presentations by Missouri Department of Conservation Education Program and Beth Tankersley-Bankhead, PhD, Executive Director of Missouri College Advising Corps, Division of Enrollment Management, University of Missouri.

HOUSE SELECT EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The Committee held an organizational and procedural meeting on January 29. The committee will serve as the oversight committee for the three education-related Regular Standing Committees: Emerging Issues in Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and Higher Education.

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS – ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee held its first meeting on January 27.  The committee heard public testimony concerning appropriations for Elementary and Secondary Education at this meeting.  Missouri NEA urged the committee to find state funding to ensure that all HB 1490 learning standards workgroup members are reimbursed for their necessary expenses.

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS – HIGHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee held its first meeting on January 28.  The committee heard brief public testimony.  The committee will begin to hear from public college and university presidents regarding their budget needs and expectations at the committee’s next meeting on Feb. 2.

PHOTO ID

The House Elections Committee heard two measures regarding voter ID requirements on January 27:  HB 30 (Dugger) and HJR 1 (Dugger).  The related measures are implementing bills that would require government photo ID for voting. Missouri NEA believes voting is a constitutional right that should not be restricted by unnecessary voter photo identification requirements or other additional barriers to the voting franchise.  The Association opposes both provisions.

Newsweek takes on the  issue of wage stagnation with Ten Reasons Workers Should Be Paid More..

Economists have long argued that increases in worker pay can lead to improvements in productivity—indeed, that it can actually be profitable to pay workers higher wages.

As Alfred Marshall, the father of modern economics, argued almost 125 years ago, “any change in the distribution of wealth which gives more to the wage receivers and less to the capitalists is likely, other things being equal, to hasten the increase of material production.”

Since then, economists have compiled rich data validating Marshall’s hypothesis that paying higher wages generates savings:

In addition to the 10 reasons listed…

Other mechanisms by which higher wages can yield offsetting benefits include:

  • Higher wages are associated with better health—less illness and more stamina, which enhance worker productivity.

  • Greater job satisfaction can result in less conflict between employers and labor groups.

  • Enhanced reputation with consumers (compare the reputations of Costco and Walmart).

 

Missouri NEA Legislative Update

Week 4, No. 3, January 28, 2015

By Otto Fajen     MNEA Legislative Director

SENATE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee heard four bills related to student transfers and accreditation on January 28: SB 1 (Pearce), SB 22 (Chappelle-Nadal), SB 49 (Sifton) and SB 70 (LeVota).  Sen. Pearce outlined the provisions of a committee substitute bill based largely on discussions with House and Senate leaders on the student transfer legislation and the Governor’s office.  Additional documents will be shared with the committee early next week and the committee may vote on a revised bill at next week’s meeting.

Revisions to the school transfer law will get a lot of attention again this session.  The transfer issue, while important, is also a symptom of the broader failings of the current accreditation system.

Missouri NEA supports efforts to restore local control regarding enrollment of non-resident students to ensure that district capacity is evaluated and respected.  The Association also supports revision to the tuition rate calculation to reduce the disproportionate impact on sending districts and extra resources to reduce the adverse impact on unaccredited districts.

HOUSE SELECT EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The Committee will hold an organizational and procedural meeting on January 29. The committee will serve as the oversight committee for the three education-related Regular Standing Committees: Emerging Issues in Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and Higher Education.

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS – HIGHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee held its first meeting on January 28.  The committee heard brief public testimony.  The committee will begin to hear from public college and university presidents regarding their budget needs and expectations at the committee’s next meeting on Feb. 2.

ALEC update

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ALEC8

…it comes from: http://www.stlmag.com/news/think-again/the-price-of-hating-obamacare/

The Price of Hating Obamacare

The Missouri GOP goes to great expense (ours) to keep the poor uninsured.

By Ray Hartmann January 16, 2015 9:23 AM

 

 

In this article Ray Hartman ties together a number of contributing factors involved in Missouri’s inability to care for its citizens.

Yahoo reported this story on a breakthrough in solar power technology that is 5 times better and 10 times cheaper than current panels.  This could be the Saudi’s worst nightmare outside of running machines on water.  They are currently driving  down the costs of oil in an attempt to discourage domestic fracking and drilling, their hope is prices will resume their upward march as domestic production declines.  If successful, this plan could be very rewarding to them and reduce the incentives for development of alternative energy.

The main problem with this strategy is if alternative energy technology has a breakthrough in the near future that has the potential to threaten both the near term effectiveness of low term energy prices and the long term upside of oil and gas prices.  Is this one of those breakthroughs?

Missouri NEA Legislative Update

Week 4, No. 2, January 27, 2015

By Otto Fajen    MNEA Legislative Director

SENATE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee will hear four bills related to student transfers and accreditation at its first meeting on January 28: SB 1 (Pearce), SB 22 (Chappelle-Nadal), SB 49 (Sifton) and SB 70 (LeVota).

Revisions to the school transfer law will get a lot of attention again this session.  The transfer issue, while important, is also a symptom of the broader failings of the current accreditation system.

Missouri NEA supports efforts to restore local control regarding enrollment of non-resident students to ensure that district capacity is evaluated and respected.  The Association also supports revision to the tuition rate calculation to reduce the disproportionate impact on sending districts and extra resources to reduce the adverse impact on unaccredited districts.

HOUSE HIGHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee held its first meeting on January 27.  The committee heard informational presentations by Missouri Department of Conservation Education Program and Beth Tankersley-Bankhead, PhD, Executive Director of Missouri College Advising Corps, Division of Enrollment Management, University of Missouri.

PHOTO ID

The House Elections Committee heard two measures regarding voter ID requirements on January 27:  HB 30 (Dugger) and HJR 1 (Dugger).  The related measures are implementing bills that would require government photo ID for voting. Missouri NEA believes voting is a constitutional right that should not be restricted by unnecessary voter photo identification requirements or other additional barriers to the voting franchise.  The Association opposes both provisions.

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS – ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee held its first meeting on January 27.  The committee heard public testimony concerning appropriations for Elementary and Secondary Education at this meeting.  Missouri NEA urged the committee to find state funding to ensure that all HB 1490 learning standards work group members are reimbursed for their necessary expenses.

Missouri NEA Legislative Update

Week 4, No. 1, January 26, 2015

By Otto Fajen   MNEA Legislative Director

HOUSE EMERGING ISSUES IN EDUCATION COMMITTEE

This newly-created committee met for the first time on January 26.  The committee held an organizational meeting.  The committee will work this session on key legislation regarding student transfers from unaccredited districts.  The committee also heard a presentation from Rep. David Wood, who is the sponsor of HB 42.  Rep. Wood will be a primary handler of House legislation regarding student transfers.  The committee will hear HB 42 next week and consider various amendments on the bill.

HOUSE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee met for the first time on January 26.  The committee held an organizational “meet and greet”.

HOUSE HIGHER EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee will hold its first meeting on January 27.  The committee will have an organizational meeting. The committee will also hear informational presentations by Missouri Department of Conservation Education Program and Beth Tankersley-Bankhead, PhD, Executive Director of Missouri College Advising Corps, Division of Enrollment Management, University of Missouri.

PHOTO ID

The House Elections Committee will hear two measures regarding voter ID requirements on January 27:  HB 30 (Dugger) and HJR 1 (Dugger).  The related measures are implementing bills that would require government photo ID for voting. Missouri NEA believes voting is a constitutional right that should not be restricted by unnecessary voter photo identification requirements or other additional barriers to the voting franchise.  The Association opposes both provisions.

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS – ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The committee will hold its first meeting on January 27.  The committee will hold an organizational meeting and hear public testimony concerning appropriations for Elementary and Secondary Education at this meeting.

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